2016 Election Results: POTUS and State Ballot Measures on the Death Penalty, Marijuana, Gun Control, and More

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On Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, Americans went to the polls and decided on our next President and a host of state-level issues. Below find results related to POTUS, the death penalty, gun control, recreational marijuana, medical marijuana, minimum wage, and physician-assisted suicide.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES (POTUS)

Republican Donald Trump with Vice President Mike Pence

DEATH PENALTY

California
a. Prop 62 would repeal the death penalty. FAILED
b. Prop 66 would reform the death penalty. PASSED

Nebraska
Referendum No. 426 would abolish the death penalty if voters vote “yes” and reinstate the death penalty if voters vote “no.” FAILED

Oklahoma
State Question 776 would guarantee the state’s power to impose the death penalty and to set methods of execution and add that power to the Oklahoma Constitution, Section 9A of Article 2. PASSED

GUN CONTROL

California
Prop 63 would ban large capacity magazines (including disposal of magazines purchased before the law goes into effect), require a permit for first-time ammunition purchases, and require a background check to purchase ammunition. Further, thefts must be reported within five days and the theft of a gun would be a felony (previously a misdemeanor if the gun were valued at less than $950). PASSED

Maine
Question Three would require a background check before a gun sale or transfer between people who are not licensed. FAILED

Nevada
Question 1 would require that gun transfers go through a licensed gun dealer. PASSED

Washington
Initiative 1491 would authorize courts to issue “extreme risk protective orders” to remove a person’s access to guns. PASSED

HEALTH CARE

Colorado
Amendment 69 would change the Colorado Constitution to create ColoradoCare, a system that would finance state-wide universal healthcare through an additional 10% payroll tax (two thirds paid by the employer and one third paid by the employee). FAILED

MARIJUANA

Arizona
Prop 205 would allow people 21 and over to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants. FAILED

California
Prop 64 would allow people 21 and over to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants. PASSED

Maine
Question 1 would allow people 21 and over to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and grow up to six plants. PASSED

Massachusetts
Question 4 would allow people 21 and over to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants. PASSED

Nevada
Question 2 would allow people 21 and over to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants. PASSED

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Arkansas
Issue 6 would legalize medical marijuana for 17 qualifying conditions. PASSED

Florida
Amendment 2 would legalize medical marijuana for 10 qualifying conditions. PASSED

Montana
I-182 would repeal the three-patient limit on medical marijuana providers. PASSED

North Dakota
Initiated Statutory Measure 5 would legalize medical marijuana for defined debilitating medical conditions. PASSED

 MINIMUM WAGE

Arizona
Proposition 206 would increase the minimum wage to $10 in 2017 and incrementally to $12 in 2020. PASSED

Colorado
Amendment 70 would increase the minimum wage to $9.30 in 2017 and incrementally to $12 in 2020. PASSED

Maine
Question 4 would increase the minimum wage to $9 in 2017 and incrementally to $12 in 2020. PASSED

South Dakota
Referred Law 20 would decrease the minimum wage for workers under 18 from $8.50 to $7.50. FAILED

Washington
Initiative 1433 would increase the minimum wage to $11.00 in 2018 and incrementally to $13.50 in 2020. PASSED

 PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED SUICIDE

Colorado
Proposition 106 would make physician-assisted suicide legal to terminally-ill people with fewer than six months to live. PASSED

For additional 2016 election results, we have linked to election coverage from Fox News, Politico, and New York Times.

Sources:

Ballotpedia, “2016 Ballot Measures,” ballotpedia.org (accessed Nov. 11, 2016)